The Beauty, Value, and Allure of Trees

Doing Your Own Tree Cutting? Improve The Efficacy Of Your Chainsaw With These Tasks

Posted by on Aug 5, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Doing Your Own Tree Cutting? Improve The Efficacy Of Your Chainsaw With These Tasks

Hiring a tree service to trim the trees around your property or even cut some down is a good idea if you’re not comfortable with doing the job yourself. However, if you own a chainsaw and know how to use it safely, you can enjoy the satisfaction of tackling a cutting project on your own. If it’s been a while since you used the chainsaw, there are a handful of simple tasks that you can perform to make it run more smoothly, make the job easier and give you a better finished product. Here are the things that you can do. Tighten The Chain Over time, the cutting chain on a chainsaw can get loose, making it dangle a little bit from the bar. If the chain gets too loose, the concern is that it could slip off when you’re cutting, which could pose a serious risk to your safety or the safety of someone who is helping you. Tightening the chain is as simple as using a special wrench that is likely in the chainsaw’s case; if not, you can buy one wherever chainsaws are sold. Check the location of the tightening nut by reading the chainsaw’s manual, and then tighten the nut with the wrench until the chain is snug on the bar. Lubricate The Chain A chainsaw chain needs to be properly lubricated to run correctly. If it’s not, it can seize in the middle of you cutting through a tree branch, which will often result in the chainsaw getting stuck in the wood and disrupting your progress. The process of lubricating the chain is simple. Although the process can slightly differ from model to model, you typically press the nozzle of a grease gun onto the sprocket at the tip of the bar, add a little grease, and then move the chain manually and add a little more. Once you’ve moved the chain one full revolution, the job is done. Sharpen The Chain A dull chainsaw chain will dramatically increase the effort you’ll need to expend to trim your trees. If it’s been a while since the chain has been sharpened, buy a sharpening kit at your local retailer and follow the instructions. Typically, you mount a bracket to the bar of the saw and use a specialized sharpening tool to rub on each of the links in the chain until it’s sharp. Doing this will greatly improve your ability to cut with...

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Three Signs Your Tree Is Dying

Posted by on Jul 27, 2016 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Three Signs Your Tree Is Dying

The beautiful, mature trees in your backyard can become diseased or even die, but with prompt attention, you may be able to save the tree or those around it. Here are three signs that your tree is dying. Its leaves are falling out It’s normal for your deciduous trees to shed their leaves during the fall, but if your trees lose some or all of that their leaves in the height of summer, your trees may be in trouble. Prematurely shedding leaves can be a sign of a variety of fungal or bacterial infections. Dutch Elm disease is one fatal tree disease which causes trees to shed their leaves prematurely. This disease can take several years to kill your trees, but most affected trees will die eventually. Bacterial blights, a bacterial disease, can also kill trees in some cases. Fortunately, there are other tree diseases that can lead to prematurely shedding leaves without killing your tree, like leaf spot or leaf blister. Before you panic about losing your beautiful backyard trees, have a tree service come out and diagnose the problem. Its bark is falling off Some types of trees, like silver maples or birch trees, naturally shed large pieces of bark in the winter, but for other types of trees, like oak or elm trees, it can be a sign of a major problem. Tree bark can be damaged by frost or by the sun, and if this damaged bark sheds from the tree, the wood underneath will be exposed. If a lot of wood is exposed, the tree may die. Peeling bark can also be a sign of Hypoxylon canker, a serious fungal disease. This disease can’t be treated, so if it’s the cause of your tree’s peeling bark, your tree will need to be cut down and burned to protect other trees in the area. It has cankers Cankers are open wounds on a tree’s bark, and they are a bad sign. These wounds can be a sign of Cytospora canker, a type of fungal disease. These cankers blend into the healthy bark, but patches of white resin on top of the cankers can make them easier to spot. The only way to deal with Cytospora canker is to prune the infected areas before the fungus can spread to other parts of the tree. If the cankers are able to grow around the diameter of the tree’s trunk, your tree will be girdled and it will die. Prompt treatment is important to keep your tree from suffering this fate. If any of the trees on your property are prematurely shedding their leaves, losing their bark, or developing cankers, they may be dying and should be evaluated by a tree service right away. Call a company like Souliere & Son Tree SpeclSts for more...

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When (And How) Can You Force Your Neighbor To Remove A Dead Tree?

Posted by on Jul 28, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on When (And How) Can You Force Your Neighbor To Remove A Dead Tree?

If you cringe each time the wind blows, for fear an errant branch may crash through your roof or window, it may be time to investigate tree removal services. However, if the tree at issue isn’t located on your property, but on a neighbor’s, this problem can become more complex. Is there any way you can require your neighbor to pay to remove a problem tree, or must you simply live with it until this tree causes damage to your property? Read on to learn more about how this situation is governed under state law.  When can you require the removal of trees not on your property? Most state laws grant you control of anything hanging over your property line. This means that not only are you allowed to trim back branches of a neighbor’s tree that encroach onto your property, you’re also allowed to collect and keep (or sell) any fruit or nuts that drop from the tree onto your property, even if the branches don’t necessarily hang over your property line. However, your control over the tree itself is much more limited. If you believe a tree poses a falling risk to your house, or you’ve already sustained damage to a fence, shed, or other outdoor structure, you may want to sue your neighbor in small claims court to force the removal of the tree. You’ll need to demonstrate that the tree poses a clear danger to your property and that the only responsible thing for your neighbor to do is to take care of the problem. If a tree isn’t at risk of hitting your home or causing other damage, it’s unlikely a judge will force its removal. Is there anything you can do to encourage your neighbor to remove a problem tree?  Taking your neighbor to court can be a scorched-earth remedy and neighborhood tensions may run high for years after the event. If you’d like a tree gone but don’t want to go the legal route, you may be able to enlist your city’s code enforcement agency or your utility company. It’s likely that if a tree is dead and dangerous enough to pose a threat to your property, it’s also encroaching on utility lines or creating an eyesore — both of which may require its removal. Quietly informing one of these agencies about your problem could help solve it while keeping you above the fray. For more information on tree removal, contact a professional like Pete & Ron’s Tree...

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Reasons You Might Need To Call A Tree Service

Posted by on Jul 27, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Reasons You Might Need To Call A Tree Service

Even if you have trees on your property, you might have never thought of hiring a professional tree service. After all, what hazard do trees pose? However, it is critical to keep your trees well-maintained for several reasons: Aesthetics This is probably the reason that you are most likely to consult a tree service. If you have a particularly large tree that is obstructing your view or preventing sunlight from reaching your garden, then you might want to trim the tree a bit, or maybe even remove it entirely. Similarly, if your tree is obstructing the view of your neighbors, then you might want to cut the tree in order to appease them. Safety Hazard Keeping your trees nice and tidy can also serve another important benefit: the preservation of your safety. If a tree is large and unkempt, then there is a chance that dangerous branches could fall and hurt someone. Even worse, especially large trees can drop branches onto the property of your neighbors, which can actually be the basis for a lawsuit! If you have small children, then keeping your trees well-maintained is even more important. While a falling branch might only be mildly inconvenient for an adult, the same branch might seriously injure a child. The process of trimming a tree itself is also a fairly dangerous task. If the tree is large, then you will need to climb a ladder while simultaneously using a sharp cutting device. There are quite a few ways that this situation can prove hazardous, so it might be a better idea to let the professionals handle it. Health Hazard One possibility that you might not consider is the health risk that your tree poses through possible pests and fungi. If your tree is dead or dying, then there is a decent chance that there are hazards dwelling within it, such as termites. A tree service will be able to check your trees for these parasites and remove them if necessary. If you don’t find these risks in time, then there is a chance that termites could spread to your house or that you could get sick from the fungi. In either case, you will end up suffering and paying a lot more than you would have if you had just hired a tree service to check your tree out. Again, trying to find hazards in your tree is probably best left to professionals. Depending on the problem, you might not know exactly what precautions to take, which could end up hurting you in the long...

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Top Three Reasons To Remove A Tree Stump

Posted by on Jul 14, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Top Three Reasons To Remove A Tree Stump

The tree is down and all that remains is the stump. It can be tempting to just leave it where it is. You can just pretend that it’s an all natural lawn ornament, or maybe set a flower pot on top to make it look a little bit more appealing. Unfortunately, an old stump can cause all sorts of trouble in your lawn. Not convinced? Then read on to find out why you should get rid of that stump. Reason #1: Stumps Pose a Traffic Hazard While large stumps are hard to miss, smaller stumps or those cut off near ground level can pose a major hazard. Not only can people trip over them when playing or running in the yard, you can cause major damage to your lawnmower if you accidentally hit a stump. Reason #2: The Attack of the “Tree Weeds” Just because the tree is cut down doesn’t mean it is dead. Tree roots often survive. This means that the tree will constantly try to regrow. You may end up with new, scraggly growth erupting from the stump itself. Sometimes, new tree saplings will show up in the lawn surrounding the stump. These trees are growing up from the roots spreading out from the stump. You will be cutting down and fighting these weedy trees for a long time if you let the stump stay. Reason #3: Pest and Problem Magnets You may think that killing the stump, usually with a chemical stump killer, will solve the weedy growth problem. Although it will, you will now have a new problem – pests. Many of the insects that will begin feasting on the dead wood are harmless, but there are quite a few that can cause major problems later. The most obvious one is the termite. Once they finish feasting on the stump, your home may be the next closest meal. What Should You Do? Now that you’re convinced that the stump must go, what’s the best way to tackle the problem? Stump removal is usually a process. First, you begin by chemically killing the roots. Most stump killers require that you drill deep holes into the stump, and then poor in the stump killer. After a set amount of time, the stump is dead. Next, you either grind it out or chop it out. If you used chemical stump killer, the stump often turns spongy and you can easily break it up with an ax and then lift the chunks out of the ground. The other option is grinding the stump down so that it’s 4 inches below the soil surface, using a stump grinder. Both are acceptable removal methods. To learn more, contact a tree stump removal company like Buskirk Tree...

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4 Types Of Plant Debris To Leave Out Of Your Home Compost Pile

Posted by on Jun 24, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 4 Types Of Plant Debris To Leave Out Of Your Home Compost Pile

If you’re like many modern homeowners, you’re interesting in living a relatively green lifestyle that includes composting yard waste. However, not all vegetative debris can or should be composted. Following is a list of four things that you should ask your landscaping service to haul away instead of putting in your compost bin. Diseased Plant Material If you have recently had a tree removed from your property because it was diseased, don’t be tempted to include its leaves and twigs in your compost pile. Ask your landscaping service to safely dispose of all traces of it. Pathogens and insect eggs can live on in vegetative debris, and by including such material in compost bins that will later be added to garden soil as an amendment, you run a serious risk of spreading the infection. Plant Material That’s Been Treated With Chemicals Including vegetative material that has been treated with chemicals such as pesticides or herbicides will only reintroduce those substances into your soil after you incorporate the contents of your compost bin into your garden area. The inclusion of nitrogen-based fertilizers commonly applied to certain trees and widely used in vegetable gardens, for instance, can cause annual and perennials plants that are grown primarily for floral display to produce mainly leaves instead of flowers. Vegetative waste such as grass clippings that are high in nitrogen can be left as mulch on the surface of the lawn or used in vegetable gardens where nitrogen is a desired element. Fungus One of the last things that you need to happen to your compost bin is a raging case of fungal organisms, so take particular care not to include vegetative waste in your compost bin that may be infected with fungal spores. For instance, never put anything that came from in or around a stump in your compost bin. Stumps provide damp environments that are highly conducive to the growth of fungal organisms, and because fungal spores are microscopic, you have no way of knowing whether or not they are present in stump debris. Other possibles sources of fungus include plant material that’s been grown in deep shade, particularly in damp areas. Because certain types of fungus can be hazardous to human health, you should always err on the side of caution where it’s concerned. Twigs Over 1/2 Inch in Diameter Twigs over 1/2 inch in diameter are simply too large to break down properly in the average compost pile. Although they will certainly decompose over time, they won’t be in step with the other materials in your bin. Leave them to a yard debris removal service like Atlas Tree Service...

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Diagnosing And Managing Armillaria Root Rot In Trees

Posted by on Jun 18, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Diagnosing And Managing Armillaria Root Rot In Trees

If your tree’s branches are looking a little sparse and its trunk has become pitted and fungus-laden, then there’s a good chance it is suffering from a fungal infection known as armillaria root rot. This condition infects and kills trees throughout the United States, and although there’s nothing you can do to save the life of your tree once symptoms set in, it is important that you know how to handle the diseased tree properly. Diagnosing Armillaria Root Rot Usually, the first symptom of this disease is branch dieback. Since this symptom is nonspecific, and can be caused by a wide array of fungal infections, it is not until symptoms start appearing in the stem that armillaria root rot is typically diagnosed. The fungus that causes the disease lives in the tree’s roots. When it eventually becomes so abundant that it starts working its way up the lower trunk of the tree, brown fungal mats start appearing on the lower stem. They may eventually take on a powdery white appearance. Brackets, or mushroom-like fungi, also start sprouting up from the roots that are closest to the surface. The fungus prevents the tree from properly sending water and nutrients up its trunk. Thus, more and more branches keep dying from lack of nutrition, and eventually the entire tree succumbs to the disease. The smaller the tree, the faster it will be overtaken by the fungus. By the time trunk symptoms appear, the tree is generally within a year or two of death. If you’re not sure whether your tree is suffering from armillaria root rot or some other disease, it pays to have a tree care expert like Hodgson’s Expert Tree Service come look at it. Trees with armillaria root rot will have to be taken down, but if the tree has another disease, you might be able to save it. Managing Armillaria Root Rot Once you have confirmed that your tree does in fact have this condition, you’ll need to have it removed from your property. Armillaria root rot is quite contagious, and as long as your tree is alive, you are giving the fungi a place to replicate, so they can then spread to other trees. If you’re planning on felling the tree yourself, make sure you also burn the stump. Spraying the stump with a chemical fungicide, such as chloropicrin or methyl bromide, is also wise. Most tree care companies will come spray a stump for you, even if you have taken the tree down yourself. Wood from higher up in the tree can be stored for later use, but the lower wood, which will have a soft, squishy texture due to the presence of fungus, should be burned quickly to eliminate the fungi. Deadly armillaria root rot can infect hundreds of species of trees. Thus, it is important to eliminate trees that have this disease in order to protect others on your property and in your...

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How To Remove A Decaying Tree By Yourself

Posted by on Jun 16, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on How To Remove A Decaying Tree By Yourself

If you have a tree in your yard that you know needs to be removed, but you want to do it yourself rather than hire a potentially expensive tree-cutting service – which may or may not include the actual removal of wood – you can attempt it safely as long as you know what procedures need to be followed, and as long as you have access to the right tools. What You Need A chainsaw Branch trimmers Rental Crane Safety wear (gloves, goggles, hard hat, etc.) Truck with a winch Stump grinder A lookout Where To Start Decaying trees need to be worked with more delicately than other trees; because much of the interior of the trunk is weak and rotted, the tree is more susceptible to falling over, and you don’t want that to happen until you are absolutely ready. The first step is to start removing branches from the trunk. This reduces the weight on the tree and makes it easier to access the trunk when you need it. Start by cutting the smaller branches from the large ones using trimmers, then use the chainsaw to remove the larger branches. Once you get up higher, it’s recommended that you use a crane instead of a ladder; ladders aren’t as stable, and you don’t want to be pushing against the tree. Once you start removing the higher and larger branches, use a rope to lower them to the ground instead of letting them fall. Start From The Top Down Once the trunk is mostly exposed, you can start the removal of the actual tree. Depending on how tall or heavy the tree is, you may not want to just send the whole thing toppling over with a cut near the bottom. This can make it harder to direct, especially if the tree has a drastic lean. Instead, start cutting parts of the trunk off from near the top of the tree. Cut horizontally and evenly, then lower the cuts to the ground. You can do this until you reach the bottom for the sake of safety, or you cut until the tree is short enough to cut down and tip over. Pushing The Tree Over Once the tree trunk is short enough so that pushing it over won’t result in any damage, you can start working on a cut near the bottom of the trunk. This will need to be done differently than other cuts; you’ll need to cut the trunk in a way that will encourage the tree to fall in a certain direction. To “aim” your tree, start by cutting a notch. The notch is a 90-degree angle cut into the side of the tree in the direction you want it to fall. Imagine a horizontal line running perpendicular to the trunk; the notch should be 30 degrees on the lower side and 60 degrees above. The depth of the notch should be about one fifth of the trunk’s diameter. Once your notch is cut, make your felling cut. This is a straight line from the opposite side of the trunk towards the center point of the notch. Leave about half an inch as the “hinge.” While you cut, make sure you have someone watching the tree for you. As soon as the tree starts to...

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4 Types Of Equipment You Need For Trimming Trees

Posted by on Jun 3, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 4 Types Of Equipment You Need For Trimming Trees

If you have trees in your backyard or front yard that need to be trimmed, there are a variety of tools and equipment needed to accomplish it. Here are the most important types of equipment to have on hand for trimming different types of trees: Chainsaws The first type of equipment you should have on hand when you are going to trim trees is a chainsaw. Depending on your level of expertise and what you feel most comfortable with, this can either be a battery-powered chainsaw or an electric chainsaw. The main difference between these two types of chainsaws is that the battery-powered models don’t have a cord, while you will need an extension cord for an electric chainsaw. However, you of course need to have enough batteries on hand, so you may prefer just plugging in the electric one. When shopping for these chainsaws, make sure you pick up a few different models to find one that feels right in your hands. Some might be too heavy or bulky, and won’t be very helpful if you have a lot of tree trimming to do. Pole Tree Pruners When it comes to pruners, the pole tree variety is the best you can get for trimming trees. There are a few different sizes of pruners, depending on the type of tree you need to trim. Pole tree pruners let you keep the tree’s natural shape and trim them effectively without having to use fancy tools or climb up a ladder. The pruners are on the end of a long pole, so you can stand on the ground and do the majority of the trimming work. Alligator Loppers If you have lighter trimming work to do, such as simply needing to remove some of the smaller branches, you can do a lot with alligator loppers. These loppers will cut branches of many different sizes, though they won’t help you with the heavy-duty cutting. It is a good idea to have a strong pair of loppers, in addition to the pruners and a chainsaw for the bigger trimming work. Wood Chippers Finally, it is a good idea to have a wood chipper on hand. Unless you plant to use all those branches as firewood or for another home project, you will need to dispose of them. This is much easier to do when you can put them in a wood chipper and use the chips as mulch for your yard. It is a great way to reuse all those branches without throwing them away. To learn more, contact a company such as Gifford Brothers Inc Tree...

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The Best Intentions Of Squirrels: How You End Up With Trees You Don’t Want And How To Remove Them

Posted by on May 26, 2015 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The Best Intentions Of Squirrels: How You End Up With Trees You Don’t Want And How To Remove Them

Seeds from all kinds of trees and plants are often redistributed in nature by animals that eat them or store them for winter. If you find that you suddenly have a few more saplings in your yard or trees on your property that you did not plant, you can thank the local wildlife. Here is how these trees came to be, how you can remove them, and how you can prevent them. Squirrels: Seed Bandits with Alzheimer’s It is the squirrel’s innate habit to find lots of seeds and nuts and hide them anywhere it can. This habit helps the fuzzy little critter keep its food larder safe from other animals that like to consume some of the same items. It also helps to store it up for winter. Unfortunately, squirrels are notorious for having bad memories. Their pea-sized brains forbid them from remembering every last place they buried a nut or seed, resulting in lots of seedlings and saplings, and eventually fully grown trees that produce more nuts and seeds. If you see a lot of squirrels in your yard, chances are good that this is where your excess trees came from. Removing the Squirrels’ Handiwork Tree removal is a lot easier to manage if you uproot the seedlings before they become saplings. You can still remove the saplings almost as easily as the seedlings by pulling them up by the roots. Some will come up out of the ground easier than others. It depends on how deep the roots have become. Once you discover a full-grown tree that is at least two years old or more, then you will need the help of a tree service (such as Chudy Tree Care) to cut it down and grind down the stump so it cannot grow back. Preventing the Squirrels from Building a Forest for You Now that you and the tree removal service have cleared away any trees you did not want nor planned on having, you need to prevent future trees from mysteriously appearing. Sonic sound emitters drive squirrels away, as do commercial chemical deterrents, which are far too smelly and offensive to a squirrel’s nose. You probably discovered that most of the trees you did not want were along your fence or property line. It is because squirrels, like people, try to use landmarks to remember where they put their stash. Spraying the deterrent in all of the areas where you found extra trees before should prevent the squirrels from burying their nuts and seeds there again, thereby preventing new tree growth as...

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